gjmueller:

Greener, Cheaper, and More Mobile

States may be getting a deal for their teachers. The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) recently released a report on the changing trends in the teaching workforce. The authors—Ingersoll, Merril, and Stuckey—found seven trends in the data. The teaching force is simultaneously becoming: larger, older, younger and less experienced, more female, more racially diverse, and more consistent in academic ability. Important to the topic of state pension plans, the report findings mean that states have more retirees to pay for. But at the same time, states are hiring younger and more transient teachers who can be paid lower salaries and often leave before qualifying for a large or even moderate pension. It’s ostensibly a bargain for the state, but a loss for individual teachers.

gjmueller:

Greener, Cheaper, and More Mobile

States may be getting a deal for their teachers. The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) recently released a report on the changing trends in the teaching workforce. The authors—Ingersoll, Merril, and Stuckey—found seven trends in the data. The teaching force is simultaneously becoming: larger, older, younger and less experienced, more female, more racially diverse, and more consistent in academic ability. Important to the topic of state pension plans, the report findings mean that states have more retirees to pay for. But at the same time, states are hiring younger and more transient teachers who can be paid lower salaries and often leave before qualifying for a large or even moderate pension. It’s ostensibly a bargain for the state, but a loss for individual teachers.



adventuresinlearning:


therealsurferrosa said: ‘Teaching as a Subversive Activity’ Postman & Weingartner. It’s why I became a teacher and, after twenty years, it’s what I wrote my dissertation around. Probably out of print now and needed more than ever!

Thanks for the suggestion. I have come past this many times and will pick it up again and read it with a new set of eyes. Both authors have really changed education for the better! Luckily, it is not out of print. There is even a Kindle version.  This book is basically a manifesto for inquiry based education. 
Here is a quote:

“There is no way to help a learner to be disciplined, active, and thoroughly engaged unless he perceives a problem to be a problem or whatever is to-be-learned as worth learning, and unless he plays an active role in determining the process of solution.”  ― Neil Postman,  Teaching as a Subversive Activity 

This quote perfectly defines the basic ideas of inquiry based education. 
-Adventures in Learning (via Adventures in Learning’s Recommendations)

adventuresinlearning:

therealsurferrosa said: Teaching as a Subversive Activity’ Postman & Weingartner. It’s why I became a teacher and, after twenty years, it’s what I wrote my dissertation around. Probably out of print now and needed more than ever!

Thanks for the suggestion. I have come past this many times and will pick it up again and read it with a new set of eyes. Both authors have really changed education for the better! Luckily, it is not out of print. There is even a Kindle version.  This book is basically a manifesto for inquiry based education.

Here is a quote:

“There is no way to help a learner to be disciplined, active, and thoroughly engaged unless he perceives a problem to be a problem or whatever is to-be-learned as worth learning, and unless he plays an active role in determining the process of solution.”
Neil Postman, Teaching as a Subversive Activity

This quote perfectly defines the basic ideas of inquiry based education.

-Adventures in Learning (via Adventures in Learning’s Recommendations)

(via hacking-curriculum)


We don’t hear the word “trust” very often in policy circles. The coin of the realm consists of colder, metallic words like “data,” “sub-population,” and “accountability.” I have heard the bizarre term “psychometrician” more often than I have heard the word “trust.” Yet I can’t think of a more foundational concept to the policy pivot points on everything from testing to teacher prep.

gjmueller:

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011.  García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.

gjmueller:

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011. García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.



What is a parcel tax? Can it be used to raise the pay for teachers?

Dear captainofthedorksquad— I hadn’t known this, exactly!

From the Wikipedia entry on “Parcel Taxes”:

The parcel tax is a form of tax used primarily in California for the funding of public education.[1] It originated in response to California’s Proposition 13, a state constitutional amendment approved by the voters in 1978. Proposition 13 limited taxation based on the assessed value of real estate to 1% per year; however, the parcel tax is a flat tax on each parcel of real estate, and does not vary according to the value of the property. Proposition 13 allowed government entities to levy “special taxes” if approved by 2/3 of the voters. Because of the requirement that 2/3 of the voters approve such a measure, it has been described as a “somewhat cumbersome funding mechanism”.[2] Research has shown that districts able to pass parcel tax measures tend to be more prosperous and to have lower percentages of minority students than those where parcel tax measures failed, or were never proposed.[3]


Can we turn Oakland into Teacher Town USA? We can if we build on what we already have started.

The best way to do this is directly supporting your teachers; encouraging city, district and labor leaders to create programs to attract teachers; volunteering at schools; passing parcel taxes to support teachers; and electing smart, passionate school board members.

My Word: Many productive ways to show appreciation to teachers by Marc Tafolla, GO Oakland Public Schools

@captainofthedorksquad: Is “parcel taxes” the funding answer?


American Teacher
captainofthedorksquad:  Need to watch this!  
The anti-Waiting for Superman.  
"As the debate over America’s public schools rages on, the one thing everyone agrees on is the need for great teachers. Yet while research has shown that teachers are the most important in-school factor in a child’s success, America’s educators are so underpaid that almost two-thirds must work a second job in order to make a living.
Chronicling the stories of four teachers in different areas of the country, American Teacher reveals the frustrating realities of today’s teachers, the difficulty of attracting talented new educators, and why so many of our best teachers leave the profession altogether. Can we re-value teaching and turn it into a prestigious, financially attractive and desirable profession? With almost half of American teachers leaving the field in the next ten years, now is the time to find out.”

American Teacher

captainofthedorksquad:  Need to watch this!  

The anti-Waiting for Superman.  

"As the debate over America’s public schools rages on, the one thing everyone agrees on is the need for great teachers. Yet while research has shown that teachers are the most important in-school factor in a child’s success, America’s educators are so underpaid that almost two-thirds must work a second job in order to make a living.

Chronicling the stories of four teachers in different areas of the country, American Teacher reveals the frustrating realities of today’s teachers, the difficulty of attracting talented new educators, and why so many of our best teachers leave the profession altogether. Can we re-value teaching and turn it into a prestigious, financially attractive and desirable profession? With almost half of American teachers leaving the field in the next ten years, now is the time to find out.”


Those who major in subjects that command higher salaries, like engineering and finance, increase their earnings advantage when they graduate into a recession. And those who major in subjects that lead to lower-paying jobs, like philosophy and music, are even more disadvantaged than in normal economic times.

A College Major Matters Even More in a Recession - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

*Is the implication that the teacher pay gap will grow?  Seems to be, I would definitely group teaching with the “lower-paying” jobs mentioned at the end of the quote.

@captainofthedorksquad

(via infoneer-pulse)


The Magic Number for Teacher Pay?
Dear captainofthedorksquad, 
I think your list of questions brought up by Teachers Have It Easy hits the nail on the head.  It is good to know that others, like Eggers & Gates, are asking these questions.
Do they propose answers?  Do they drop suggested salaries?
In this first week of summer, I’ve been asking everyone I know in Ed—experienced teachers, starting teachers, and teachers who have moved out of the classroom—how much should a starting teacher make, in the ideal world?
Almost all suggest the same figure: $60,000-70,000 for a first year teacher*
*This is double what I made in my first year, and is far more than I currently make in my sixth year.    
*many people stipulated that these teachers MUST have a Masters/have done student teaching. 
Where are they getting this number from?  
From other friends who are similar ages, starting as professionals, from people we went to college with, from family members, from the expenses of living in the Bay Area. 
Obviously, this is an informal poll, but the trend is interesting to me.  
And then, of course, how does the money get to the education system?
Is it taxes (Yay!!!)?
Is it an Angel Donor from the tech world (I can feel Ravitch frowning)?
Is it charters that forge the way, driving up competition, till public schools are forced into a corner?
A next step for our research: Look at schools (in America, public/private, in other countries) that DO pay that well.  How do they get their money?  How do they justify this expense?  What do they require of their teachers?
Sidenote—USA! USA! CONCACAF!
USA!
See you soon.  I Swipe you RIGHT!  never left.
@postmodernnovice

The Magic Number for Teacher Pay?

Dear captainofthedorksquad

I think your list of questions brought up by Teachers Have It Easy hits the nail on the head.  It is good to know that others, like Eggers & Gates, are asking these questions.

Do they propose answers?  Do they drop suggested salaries?

In this first week of summer, I’ve been asking everyone I know in Ed—experienced teachers, starting teachers, and teachers who have moved out of the classroom—how much should a starting teacher make, in the ideal world?

Almost all suggest the same figure: $60,000-70,000 for a first year teacher*

*This is double what I made in my first year, and is far more than I currently make in my sixth year.    

*many people stipulated that these teachers MUST have a Masters/have done student teaching. 

Where are they getting this number from?  

From other friends who are similar ages, starting as professionals, from people we went to college with, from family members, from the expenses of living in the Bay Area. 

Obviously, this is an informal poll, but the trend is interesting to me.  

And then, of course, how does the money get to the education system?

  • Is it taxes (Yay!!!)?
  • Is it an Angel Donor from the tech world (I can feel Ravitch frowning)?
  • Is it charters that forge the way, driving up competition, till public schools are forced into a corner?

A next step for our research: Look at schools (in America, public/private, in other countries) that DO pay that well.  How do they get their money?  How do they justify this expense?  What do they require of their teachers?

Sidenote—USA! USA! CONCACAF!

USA!

See you soon.  I Swipe you RIGHT!  never left.

@postmodernnovice


Unfortunately, the way computer science is currently taught in high school tends to throw students into the programming deep end, reinforcing the notion that code is just for coders, not artists or doctors or librarians. But there is good news: Researchers have been experimenting with new ways of teaching computer science, with intriguing results. For one thing, they’ve seen that leading with computational thinking instead of code itself, and helping students imagine how being computer savvy could help them in any career, boosts the number of girls and kids of color taking—and sticking with—computer science. Upending our notions of what it means to interface with computers could help democratize the biggest engine of wealth since the Industrial Revolution.

Teacher Pay & “Comparable Careers”

Dearest captainofthedorksquad:

So, this white paper is no longer hosted by the Economic Policy Institute, but these findings caught my eye:

  • "States vary widely in the extent to which public school teachers are paid less than other college graduates. In 15 states, public school teacher weekly wages lag by more than 25%. In contrast, there are only five states where teacher weekly wages are less than 10% behind, and no state where teacher pay is equal or better than that of other college graduates.”
  • Raising teacher compensation is a critical component in any strategy to recruit and retain a higher quality teacher workforce if the goal is to affect the broad array of teachers—that is, move the quality of the median teacher. Policies that solely focus on changing the composition of the current compensation levels, such as merit or pay-for-performance schemes, are unlikely to be effective unless they also correct the teacher compensation disadvantage in the labor market.”

(Lawrence MishelSylvia A. Allegretto and Sean P. Corcoran)

It is known.  

I am reading Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch right now, and she SLAMS merit the idea of merit pay; I think the second bullet point is important here.  Merit pay, even if one agreed with the notion, would not be effective unless the education field offers competitive salaries, to even attract merited professionals.  

With love.  I swipe you left (right?)

postmodernnovice


lauriehalseanderson:

wearestill:



Sheikh Zayed Mosque, Abu Dhabi: Inlaid flowers wind across the mosque’s 183,000-square-foot marble courtyard.
Photograph by Dave Yoder, National Geographic



I visited this mosque in February. Absolutely breathtaking.

lauriehalseanderson:

wearestill:

I visited this mosque in February. Absolutely breathtaking.


smartgirlsattheparty:

womenrockscience:
Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.
Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.
During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.
With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.
Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”
Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

Smart Girl Rocket Scientist Alert!!

smartgirlsattheparty:

womenrockscience:

Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.

Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.

During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.

With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.

Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”

Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

Smart Girl Rocket Scientist Alert!!